Do DN-SC3700's display waveforms in CD mode?

I’m completely new to these players and I can’t find this mentioned anywhere. I got a pair today to replace my CDJ1000MK3’s which don’t have usb functionality, but I was expecting waveforms on both cd and usb, and as of now, only files scanned in Music Manager show the data.

Also, I hooked up a 500GB external HDD with +/-2000 wav files a couple of hours ago, and it still tells me ‘now checking’ when I push the usb button. How long is it supposed to take? Can’t find any info on the max capacity of the drive, and I’m well below 50000 files. I believe I’m doing something wrong. I was planning on using these as stand alone players sharing a HDD.

Music Manager doesn’t read the metadata on my files, only the filename is shown. Do I really have to put it in manually in the software track by track? Everything is there already, it should just read it right? Win10 wont recognize the device either. I know they are old but not that old…

I was and still am looking forward to using these so if someone could shed some light on these issues, I’d be grateful.

Dn-s3700 does not display any waveforms. I think the first was SC3900 to display a preview waveform.

The DN-S3700 was introduced in 2009 so it’s a teenager now.

Music manager was basic and the database it created was not any sort of SQL standard, but it did have a couple of advantages over Engine Prime/Engine OS data, namely the search results appeared instantly (none of this “updating” nonsense of Prime search today) and the database usage made sense, with you just pointing to a new folder of tunes and clicking “add to database” - done.

Waveform wise, the way forward is to rip all your CDs to hard drive files - you’ll be doing it sooner or later anyway, so might as well start now. Lol

But no, if you (really really) need heaps of metadata for the way that you DJ then you’ll need Prime 4, Prime 2, Prime Go, or Prime SC

I read the manual before buying them but nowhere did it say which size HDD was supported. Just found out FAT32 means the disksize can’t be more than 32GB. So that answers that (I forgot my drive was ntfs) I’m now downloading some software that allows to format large capacity drives to FAT32. Fingers crossed.

I already ripped my cd’s and backed it up to an external drive which I was planning to use. I was also still thinking both decks could share one drive before buying them, and because my older CDJ1000’s show waveforms for CD’s and CD-rom, no extra software required. The cdj2000 and cdj900 were released a year prior the DNS3700 and this was Denon’s flagship, meant to outperform the competition. They’re even cheeky about it in the manual. I assumed some features Pioneer already had in 2006 would be improved or at least the same on the DNS3700. Turns out that’s not exactly the case. I don’t even like Pioneer, but it’s all I can get around here, so to see a pair of affordable Denon’s and knowing their reputation, I got excited a bit too soon I guess. I could have known all this beforehand but by then they would have been sold at that price, so I jumped. I’m not dissapointed with the quality and features at all, in many ways they do outperform the CDJ’s but it’s where they don’t that kinda bums me out. I remember 2010 like it was 12 years ago, filling up my external 1TB USB3 HDD like it was 1999 and I just discovered Soulseek. What I mean is 2010 was already the future of technology, so why didn’t they go for it?

I don’t need heaps of metadata, but the usual track, artist, album, etc would have been nice. Now MM just reads the filename. If I don’t manually fill in the blanks, that’s all I have to search for on the decks, so not that efficient, and I’m still looking for a solution, but first I’ll try to get the hard drives running.

I’m going to try to use them with Mixxx, if I can get it running properly because I don’t know ■■■■ about midi mapping or dj software. I just wanted to press play.

Ermmmmmm not quite. FAT32, as could be easily discerned by the 32 suffix , uses 32 bits to represent each cluster value. The more notable FAT variant that preceded FAT32, commonly known as FAT16, uses 16 bits; older versions of FAT used 12 and 8 bits. More bits directly translate to more locations that can be addressed and more total usable storage. FAT32 can have partitions of up to 2TB or 2000GB, which is significantly more compared to the 4GB limit that can be addressed by FAT16. FAT32 also has a 4GB limit to the size of individual files.

There are other FAT replacements on the horizon like exFAT, but it is meant for newer, removable media like SDXC. For current media with capacitites of under 32GB, FAT32 is still the most appropriate version of FAT to use.

1 Like